Leftover Mashed Potato Gnocchi

gnocchi title

I have two words to describe this recipe. Game. Changer.

I had lots of leftover mashed potatoes that needed to be used somehow and after a little Google search, I ran across this recipe. Lets just say that I’ll now go out of my way to make extras just so I can make more gnocchi. PS: If you’ve never had them, gnocchi are delicious Italian potato dumplings aka puffy potato clouds sent from heaven.

They’re SO easy to make – you can eat them fresh or freeze them for later and there are countless sauce/meat/veggie options to combine. And since I love yall so much and want to encourage you to try making them yourself, I made a little step-by-step photo tutorial! Here we go.

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1. Spread half of the flour (1/2 cup) onto your counter or work space. Add the mashed potatoes on top and make a little dip/well/indention in the middle. Add the beaten egg to the well on top.

2. Sprinkle the other half of the flour (1/2 cup) and the salt on top.

3. Mix the ingredients together until they form a ball of dough. You can use a pastry cutter to combine, but I just used my hands! (It’s messy, but fun) If the ball of dough is really sticky, work in a little more flour until it’s smoother and easier to work with.

4. Cut the dough into four parts.

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5. Using your hands, roll out each section of dough on the counter until it’s roughly 3/4 inch in diameter.

6. Then use a knife (or a pizza cutter works well) to cut the rolls of dough into pieces about 3/4 inch. (doesn’t have to be perfect!)

7. Then use a fork to make grooves in each piece of gnocchi. This is important, otherwise the sauce won’t cling to it very well. This also doesn’t have to be perfect and might take a few tries to get it down. Just lightly roll it along the tines of the fork.

gnocchi3

8. As you work, it’s best to place each piece on a lightly floured or lined baking sheet so they stay separate and don’t get stuck together. Also, if you want to freeze the gnocchi for future use, simply place the whole tray in the freezer until they are frozen solid. Then quickly put them in a zipper freezer bag, squeeze out all the air, and pop them in the freezer. Just make sure to transfer them to the bag fast, before they defrost and get sticky. Then when you’re ready to use them, pour them right into boiling water!

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10. To cook the gnocchi, bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Then drop the gnocchi right in (whether fresh or frozen) and they’ll sink to the bottom.

11. Let them be, and as they cook, they’ll start to float to the top. It won’t take long!

12. When they’re finished and floating, you can either gently scoop them out with a slotted spoon and add them right to your sauce or drain the water (gently, they’re delicate!) and either add your sauce right to the pot or plate them and add the sauce when ready to eat.

gnocchi5

13. You can toss them with any kind of sauce you prefer (pesto, marinara, butter, cream…) and add meat, vegetables, or whatever you’re in the mood for. My personal faves are marinara with Italian sausage (above) or basil pesto with chicken.

Here’s the recipe all together:

Leftover Mashed Potato Gnocchi

Ingredients:
2 cups leftover mashed potatoes (cold)
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 large egg, beaten
3/4 tsp salt

Yield: 3-4 servings

Directions:
Spread half of the flour (1/2 cup) onto your counter or work space. Add the mashed potatoes on top and make a little dip/well/indention in the middle. Add the beaten egg to the well on top.

Sprinkle the other half of the flour (1/2 cup) and the salt on top. Mix the ingredients together until they form a ball of dough. You can use a pastry cutter to combine, but I just used my hands! (It’s messy, but fun) If the ball of dough is really sticky, work in a little more flour until it’s smoother and easier to work with.

Cut the dough into four parts. Using your hands, roll out each section of dough on the counter until it’s roughly 3/4 inch in diameter. Then use a knife (or a pizza cutter works well) to cut the rolls of dough into pieces about 3/4 inch. (doesn’t have to be perfect!)

Then use a fork to make grooves in each piece of gnocchi. This is important, otherwise the sauce won’t cling to it very well. This also doesn’t have to be perfect and might take a few tries to get it down. Just lightly roll it along the tines of the fork.

As you work, it’s best to place each piece on a lightly floured or lined baking sheet so they stay separate and don’t get stuck together. Also, if you want to freeze the gnocchi for future use, simply place the whole tray in the freezer until they are frozen solid. Then quickly put them in a zipper freezer bag, squeeze out all the air, and pop them in the freezer. Just make sure to transfer them to the bag fast, before they defrost and get sticky. Then when you’re ready to use them, pour them right into boiling water!

To cook the gnocchi, bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Then drop the gnocchi right in (whether fresh or frozen) and they’ll sink to the bottom. Let them be, and as they cook, they’ll start to float to the top. It won’t take long!

When they’re finished and floating, you can either gently scoop them out with a slotted spoon and add them right to your sauce or drain the water (gently, they’re delicate!) and either add your sauce right to the pot or plate them and add the sauce when ready to eat.

Toss or top with your desired sauce, meat, cheese, vegetables, etc and enjoy while hot.

Source: The Art of Doing Stuff

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8 thoughts on “Leftover Mashed Potato Gnocchi

  1. so mine came out ugly lol practice makes perfect, but they were very tastey. I used white whole wheat flour cause that’s all I had and im commenting to tell you thankyou for an idea that my kids actually ate and liked. my 3 year can be picky and she asked for more. we had them in a parmesan garlic cheese sauce, I will be saving this to my recipe booklet for future reference! thanks again!

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